Department of History College of Arts and Sciences
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Event Calendar

Some of the events listed here are not sponsored directly by the Department of History, but they are of interest to historians.

  


Continuing Events


 

 5, 12, 19, 26 February 2015
National Civil Rights Museum and Memphis Public Library
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

Poster for the event

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is a special initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. It aims to encourage communities across the country to revisit the history of civil rights in the U.S. and to reflect on the ideals of freedom and equality that have helped bridge deep racial and cultural divides in American life through the viewing and discussion of four powerful documentary films. These scholar-led film viewings and discussions will be on the following dates:

  • 5 February, 6-8 pm, National Civil Rights Museum: Slavery by Another Name, led by Dr Earnestine Jenkins, associate professor of art history at The University of Memphis
  • 12 February, 6-8 pm, Meeting Rooms A-C, Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library: The Loving Story, led by Dr Beverly Bond, associate professor of history at The University of Memphis
  • 19 February, 6-8 pm, Meeting Rooms A-C, Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library: The Abolitionists, led by Dr Susan O’Donovan, associate professor of history at The University of Memphis
  • 26 February, 6-8 pm, National Civil Rights Museum: Freedom Riders, led by Dr Aram Goudsouzian, professor of history and chair of the Department of History at The University of Memphis

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is brought to Memphis by the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and the American Library Association.  

 


February 2015


 

2 February 2015
7 pm
Wunderlich Auditorium, Memphis University School, 6191 Park Avenue
Meeting of the West Tennessee Historical Society

Aram GoudsouzianDr Aram Goudsouzian, chairman of the Department of History at the University of Memphis, will present his book Down To The Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power and the Meredith March Against Fear. This narrative history of the civil rights movement is told through James Meredith’s tumultuous 1966 march from Memphis to Jackson, Mississippi, down U.S. Highway 51 that began as a voter-registration drive.

 

 

5 February 2015
6-8 pm
National Civil Rights Museum
Slavery by Another Name

Film poster

Viewing and discussion of the film, led by Dr Earnestine Jenkins, associate professor of art history at The University of Memphis, in the series Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle.

Even as slavery ended in the South after the Civil War, new forms of forced labor kept thousands of African-Americans in bondage until the onset of World War II. This film is based on the 2008 Pulitzer Prize-winning book of the same title by Douglas Blackmon.

 

 

 

 

6 February 2015
1:45 pm
Location to be announced
Presentations of dissertation prospectuses

Jeffery Jones and Scott Frizzell will make presentations.

Other candidates who have been approved by their committees to present a prospectus should contact Dr Daniel Unowsky as soon as possible.

 

6 February 2015
6:30 pm — reception
7 pm — lecture
Fountain View Suite (room 350) of the University Center
“‘The Mysterious Meritefnut’: A Missing Persons Case for the 7th Century BC”

Dr Jeremy PopeLecture by Dr Jeremy Pope, assistant professor of history at the College of William and Mary.

A pair of objects from the 7th century BC attest to the existence of a Nubian woman named Meritefnut, and her title as “God's Wife” would have made her not only the most powerful woman in Egypt and Nubia, but arguably the most powerful woman in the world at that time. Yet to this day we do not know what she did, to whom she was related, or why she is so seldom mentioned in other inscriptions. She is simply called by scholars “the mysterious Meritefnut.” This lecture will propose an identification of Meritefnut and explain why she has remained so mysterious.

Dr Pope is a member of the editorial board of African Archaeological Review and the author of The Double Kingdom under Taharqo: Studies in the History of Kush and Egypt c. 690-664 BC, published by E. J. Brill in 2014.

The lecture is sponsored by the Egyptology Graduate Student Association.

 

11 February 2015
12:30-2 pm
342 University Center
“Understanding as Respect(ing)”

Dr Remy DebesLecture by Dr Remy Debes, Department of Philosophy, in the Humanities Brown Bag Series for faculty sponsored by the Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities.

What is it to understand another person? By this I don't mean, what is to understand something a person says, or does, or feels, etc.? I mean, what is to understand her—that is holistically. The former question has been offered many answers in philosophy (as well as other fields). The latter question, on the other hand, has rarely even been posed, which is striking given that we certainly sometimes imply this meaning when we make claims to understand others. In this talk I will first clarify the content of such claims. Second, however, I will advance the following further thesis about the nature of such holistic understanding: understanding another person holistically constitutes a kind of respect for her. I conclude by speculating whether it follows that in some sense we have a moral duty to understand other people.

 

11-13 February 2015
16th Annual Graduate Conference in African-American History
University Center

Conference poster

The Graduate Association for African-American History has published a tentative program and has placed an event listing for the conference on Facebook.

This year’s conference will feature a luncheon and lecture by Dr Daniel Maitlin of King’s College London for the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change and a keynote address for GAAAH by Dr Eddie S. Glaude of Princeton University.

  

12 February 2015
Noon-1:30 pm
Bluff Room of the University Center (room 308)
Lecture by Dr Daniel Maitlin and Luncheon of the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change

Book coverDr Daniel MaitlinDr Daniel Maitlin was a co-winner of the Hooks Institute National Book Award for On the Corner: African-American Intellectuals and the Urban Crisis. He is a lecturer in the history of the United States of America since 1865 in King’s College London.

The luncheon and lecture are free and open to the public.

The event is co-sponsored by the Graduate Association for African-American History as part of the 16th Annual Graduate Conference in African-American History

 

12 February 2015
6 pm — reception
6:30 pm — keynote address
7:30 pm — question-and-answer session
7:45-8:15 pm — book signing in lobby
University Center Ballroom

Dr Eddie GlaubeDr Eddie Glaude will speak on “The Values Gap: Race and Contemporary American Politics" as the keynote speaker for the 16th Annual Graduate Conference in African-American History.

Dr Glaude is William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies in the Department of Religion, and Chair, Center for African American Studies, at Princeton University.  His books include In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America and Exodus!: Religion, Race, and Nation in Early 19th Century Black America.

 

 

 

12 February 2015
6-8 pm
Meeting Rooms A-C, Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library
The Loving Story

Film poster and Dr Beverly Bond

Viewing and discussion of the film, led by Dr Beverly Bond, associate professor of history at The University of Memphis, in the series Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle.

The moving account of Richard and Mildred Loving, who were arrested in 1958 for violating Virginia’s ban on interracial marriage. Their struggle culminated in a landmark Supreme Court decision, Loving v. Virginia (1967) which overturned anti-miscegenation laws in the United States.

 

 

 

19 February 2015
6-8 pm
Meeting Rooms A-C, Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library
The Abolitionists

Film poster and Dr Susan O'DonovanViewing and discussion of the film, led by Dr Susan O’Donovan, associate professor of history at The University of Memphis, in the series Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle.

A small group of moral reformers in the 1830s launched one of the most ambitious social movements imaginable: the immediate emancipation of millions of African-Americans held in bondage, at a time when slavery was one of the most powerful economic and political forces in the United States. 

 

 

 

21 February 2015
8 am-4 pm
Third floor of the University Center
West Tennessee History Day

Tennessee History Day logoThe Department of History is the host for West Tennessee History Day in which middle-school and high-school students in the area compete to advance to Tennessee History Day, which will be held in Nashville on 11 April at Polk Theater, Tennessee Tower, Legislative Plaza, and Nashville Public Library. Winners there will advance to national competition at National History Day in June at the University of Maryland, College Park.

The theme for 2015 is “Leadership and Legacy in History.” See our page for West Tennessee History Day for detailed information.

 

 

24 February 2015
5:30-7:30 pm
River Room of the University Center (room 300)
Website release party of the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute For Social Change

Voter registration in Fayette County, TennesseeThe Hooks Institute will be releasing its Mapping Civil Rights History and Tent City websites at this special release event. The Mapping Civil Rights History website will allow users to explore pivotal civil rights locations through photos and history on the interactive map. The Tent City website chronicles the struggles as well as the victories of civil-rights era activists in Fayette County, Tennessee.

 

 

 

25 February 2015
12:30-2 pm
342 University Center
“The Legalities of Exploitation: Treaty-Making in Native America”

Dr William CampbellLecture by Dr William Campbell, Department of History, in the Humanities Brown Bag Series for faculty sponsored by the Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities.

Dissecting the personal politicking and legalities of treaty negotiations in North American history is a messy task, often with contentious contemporary implications. As people and empires collided and redefined themselves, struggles over trade, land, and sovereignty frequently defined deliberations. The protocols and precedents established by negotiations immediately following the American Revolution remain important to rulings and arguments today. Contracted by the National Parks Service to revisit and reinterpret the terms and means of a number of late-eighteenth-century treaties, Dr. Campbell will explore some of these themes and aspects as he discusses most recent research.

 

 

26 February 2015
6-8pm
National Civil Rights Museum
Freedom Riders

Film posterViewing and discussion of the film, led by Dr Aram Goudsouzian, professor of history and chair of the Department of History at The University of Memphis, in the series Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle.

The Freedom Rides of 1961 were a pivotal moment in the long civil rights struggle that redefined America. Based on Raymond Arsenault’s recent book, this documentary film offers an inside look at the brave band of activists who challenged segregation in the Deep South.

 

 

 

 

28 February 2015
10 am-2 pm
Art Museum of the University of Memphis, 142 Communications and Fine Arts Building
Family Day at the Egyptian Institute

Figure of AnubisDetails have not been announced yet.

 

 

 

 

 

 


March 2015


  

7 March 2015
10 am
Brownsville, Tennessee
Meeting of the West Tennessee Historical Society

Elbert WilliamsWTHS member Jim Emison will present the story of Elbert Williams of Brownsville, Tennessee, who was murdered 20 June 20, 1940. Mr Williams was the first NAACP member in the nation known to have been killed for his civil-rights work. Elbert Williams, First To Die is the working title of Emison’s book in progress, chronicling the murder, the unsuccessful efforts of the NAACP to obtain a federal civil rights prosecution, a reluctant FBI’s investigation, and the U. S. Justice Department’s reversal of its decision to prosecute.

The presentation will be in the Delta Room behind Backyard Barbeque, 703 East Main Street, Brownsville, Tennessee.

 

 

 

18 March 2015
12:30-2 pm
342 University Center
“Environmental Insecurity: Assessing Environment Change, ‘Threats,’ and ‘Gender’”

Dr Nikki DetrazLecture by Dr Nikki Detraz, Department of Political Science and Center for Research on Women, in the Humanities Brown Bag Series for faculty sponsored by the Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities.

Environmental security is a concept that acknowledges connections between environmental change and security broadly construed. Dr. Detraz explores the various ways that actors have linked the issues of security and the environment over the past few decades and the gendered implications of these links. She will discuss how gender can be fruitfully included in the ways that we understand issues of resource conflict, human vulnerability stemming from environmental change, and security threats to the environment itself.

 

26 March 2015
5:30 pm — reception
6 pm — lecture
University Center Theater
“To Gain Title to Our Bodies: Black Women and the Long Civil Rights Movement”

Dr Danielle McGuireBook coverLecture by Dr Danielle McGuire, assistant professor of history at Wayne State University.

Dr McGuire’s book At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape and Resistance—a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power was published by Knopf in 2010 and issued as a Vintage paperback in 2011. Her current book project will investigate the ways in which ordinary people experienced the 1967 Detroit racial uprising.  

This is the Belle McWilliams Lecture in U.S. history for 2014-2015, sponsored by the Department of History. It is also an event of the Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities, co-sponsored by the Center for Research on Women, African and African American Studies, and the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change.

 


April 2015


 

9 April 2015
12:30-2 pm
338 University Center
“Stories that Stick to the Skin: Visualizing Transatlantic Slavery in African Diasporic Art”

Dr Celeste-Marie BernierLecture by Dr Celeste-Marie Bernier, Department of Art, in the Humanities Brown Bag Series for faculty sponsored by the Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities.

Drawing on unpublished archival materials and artist interviews, this talk will trace issues related to representation, memory, and the body in the last fifty years of African-American and Black British Art. Examining paintings, drawings, installations, sculture, and mixed-media artworks by African Diasporic artists—and including some never-before-seen works—this talk will come to grips with the powerful ways in which the task of imaging slavery and imagining freedom remains an ever ongoing, unfinished, and lifelong project and one which results in “stories that stick to the skin.”

 

16 April 2015
12:30-2 pm
342 University Center
“Reading Like a Realist”

Dr Donal HarrisLecture by Dr Donal Harris, Department of English, in the Humanities Brown Bag Series for faculty sponsored by the Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities.

For the last ten years or so, novelists and literary critics have devoted an inordinate amount of mental energy to the possibility that literature, and particularly the novel, might not matter anymore. The causes of this cultural demotion are legion, but an eclectic array of authors and scholars has clustered around an unlikely solution to the novel's felt irrelevancy: a return to literary realism. This talk takes inspiration from recent work on the sociology of reading to lay out how realism becomes both an asthetic strategy and, more surprisingly, an ideal reading practice for those attempting to reinstate the novel as an important cultural form.

 


May 2015


 

1 May 2015
12:30 pm
223 Mitchell Hall
“The Job Market”

ToolboxPart of a series of professionalization workshops for MA and PhD students. This session is for PhD students. It will be led by Dr Andrew Daily.

This is the last workshop in the series for the current academic year.

 

 

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