Graduate Catalog
History

ARAM GOUDSOUZIAN, PhD
Chair
Room 221, Mitchell Hall
(901) 678-2720


JAMES BLYTHE, PhD
Coordinator of Graduate Studies
Email: jmblythe@memphis.edu

http://www.memphis.edu/history

I. The Department of History offers programs of study leading to the Master of Arts degree and the Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major in History. We specialize in U.S. (especially African American) history and European history, with offerings in Asian, Latin American, Russian, African, women/gender, and global history; we also offer a concentration in Ancient Egyptian history.

Program objectives are: (1) development of the ability to think and write historically about contemporary and past problems and issues, to handle the evidentiary basis for historical arguments, to use primary and secondary sources; (2) acquisition of an appreciation of the diversity of human experience and a sympathetic understanding of at least one non-U.S. culture; (3) ability to make an evaluative presentation of historical material; (4) production of a publishable-quality piece of writing (Ph.D.); and (5) preparation for positions related to the discipline of history (e.g., teaching, librarian, researcher, etc.) for those graduates who seek such employment.

The Graduate Admissions Committee evaluates MA applications three times a year and PhD applications twice a year. All PhD and MA applications for Spring semester are due by September 15. All PhD applications for Summer and Fall and all MA applications from those seeking an assistantship are due by January 15, which is also the deadline for the separate assistantship application. We will also accept MA applications up to April 15 for the following summer and fall, but we do not consider such applications for assistantships. Only in exceptional circumstances will we renew an assistantship beyond two academic years for MA students, three academic years for PhD students who have not completed their Comprehensive Exams, or five years in total for PhD students.

For a full description of our graduate program, its requirements, and our faculty, see the History Department's Guide for Graduate Students, www.memphis.edu/history/gradguide/title.htm

 All graduate students must comply with the general requirements of the Graduate School (see Admissions Regulations, Academic Regulations, and Minimum Degree Requirements) as well as the program requirements of the degree being pursued.

II. MA Degree Program

The MA program of study in history is a flexible one that prepares students for a variety of careers. We expect full-time students to complete the degree in two academic years. Students who regard the MA as a terminal degree normally elect to fulfill its requirements by 33 hours of course enrollment without writing a thesis. Most of these students go on to teaching positions on the secondary and community college level; a smaller number enter government service at all levels; and some secure specialized positions in business, industry, and journalism. Those students preparing for teaching on the university level or related careers in research and writing should look upon the MA program as preparation for advanced graduate study. We thus urge them to write a thesis.

A. Program Admission

In making our decisions on admission we consider multiple factors, including transcripts and GPA, the nature of your coursework, recommendations, your writing sample and statement, your MAT or GRE scores (particularly the GRE Verbal and Analytical Writing sections), and the compatibility of our program and faculty with your interests.

In most cases, you will need 18 hours in history from an accredited institution with at least a 3.0 PGA (on a 4.0 scale) in all undergraduate history courses, although we may also consider coursework in related fields.

In addition to submitting your application and all transcripts to the Graduate School, you should submit the following, the first to the Graduate School and the rest to the History Department:

  1. Official scores from the MAT or from the GRE (which should include the Analytical Writing section).
  2. Two letters of recommendation evaluating your academic ability.
  3. A writing sample, such as a paper from a course, that demonstrates your ability to write and think about history.
  4. A letter from you explaining your major field(s) of interest in history (chosen from the list of PhD fields below), any particular interests, and your reasons for seeking the MA degree.

B. Program Requirements

  1. A total of 33 hours. For the student electing to write a thesis, this includes 9 hours of thesis credit. No more than 9 hours of thesis credit may count toward the degree.
  2. No more than 6 hours at the 6000 level.
  3. At least one 7000-level historiography course in any field and at least one HIST 7070 seminar. Only 3 hours can be History 7012, although we may accept 6 hours in special circumstances by petition to the Coordinator of Graduate Studies. The following courses do not count toward the degree: HIST 7021 and 7991.
  4. No more than 6 hours may be taken, with the approval of the Coordinator of Graduate Studies, in a field outside history. Under special circumstances students may petition for up to an additional 6 hours.
  5. No more than 24 hours may be taken in United States History, European History, or any one field of history, such as Ancient History.
  6. No grade of C+ or lower may count toward the required number of credits.
  7. An oral Comprehensive Examination over course work given by a committee chosen by the Graduate Advisor and the student.
  8. For those who elect to write a thesis, approval by a department committee headed by the faculty member who directed the thesis. All theses are based upon primary research and are typically between 16,000 and 25,000 words in length. NOTE: Students electing to write a thesis should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.

C. Concentration in Ancient Egyptian History (Note: "Concentration" refers to a specific program in this area. It does not imply that this is our only area of specialization.)

Beyond the core requirements, students choosing this concentration must take 18 hours of MA level courses with a focus on ancient Egypt; this includes 9 hours of thesis credit for those writing a thesis. As part of the 18 credits, students must take two semesters of basic Middle Egyptian (ARTH 7115 and 7116), plus two more semesters of readings from ancient Egyptian texts. Courses in ancient art, archaeology, and language (taught in the Art, Earth Sciences, and/or Foreign Language departments) may count as being in field(s) separate from the field of ancient history. Admission into the graduate program in history does not automatically ensure admission into this concentration.  The approval of the department's Egyptologists is also necessary, so students should contact them directly.

D. The Online M.A. Program

The History Department also offers an online MA degree program in which all the degree requirements may be completed online. Admission requirements are the same as for the on-campus MA program, but you must specify in your application and the required letter discussing your interests that you are applying for the online MA degree. Requirements for the online MA degree are also the same as for the on-campus MA with the following exceptions: a) the thesis option is not available to online students; b) online students may apply up to 9 hours of 6000-level history courses to the degree; and c) online students may, with the permission of the Graduate Coordinator, substitute a written exam for the oral comprehensive exam.

III. PhD Degree Program

The Department of History also offers a program of study built upon the MA degree leading to the PhD degree. The program is designed to provide wide knowledge in two fields, more intensive preparation in a third field, and professional competence in original research and writing that will prepare the student for teaching and research in higher education or for a career in government, business, library service, and other research-related fields.

A. Program Admission

In making our decisions on admission we consider multiple factors, including transcripts and GPA, the nature of your coursework, recommendations, your writing sample and statement, your GRE scores (particularly the Verbal and Analytical Writing sections), the compatibility of our program with your interests, and availability of faculty to supervise your major field.

In most cases, you will need 24 graduate hours in history with at least a 3.25 GPA (on a 4.0 scale) from an accredited institution, or a M.A. in a related field that we judge as sufficient preparation for our PhD program. We strongly recommend an MA in history.

In addition to submitting your application and all transcripts to the Graduate School, you should submit the following, the first to the Graduate School and the rest to the History Department:

  1. Official GRE scores, which should include the Analytical Writing section.
  2. A 750-1000 work “Statement of Purpose,” in which you explain your educational goals, anticipated fields of study, and general research interests. In this statement, we expect you to demonstrate some familiarity with the history department’s program and faculty.
  3. Three letters of recommendation commenting on your academic ability and suitability for PhD work.
  4. A writing sample, consisting either of a MA thesis or a paper written for a graduate course in history (preferred) or a related field.

As part of the admission process, the Graduate Admissions Committee will seek input from department members in the applicant's field of interest.

B. Advising

The Coordinator of Graduate Studies will advise students when they first enroll. During the first school year enrolled, and whenever possible within the first semester, each student will choose an advisory committee to be composed of a major professor with full graduate faculty rank and at least two other faculty members. This committee assists the student in determining such matters as fields of study, the choice of courses, acceptance of transfer credit, and acceptance of credit from the master’s degree. The committee provides all of its decisions in writing with copies to the student and to the Coordinator of Graduate Studies.

C. Foreign Language

All students whose major field is not in U.S. history must demonstrate reading proficiency in one foreign language, whenever possible one directly related to the dissertation field. Proficiency consists of acceptably translating a selection from a historical work or source. The advisory committee may require the student to demonstrate reading knowledge in two or more foreign languages. It will be up to the advisory committee to determine whether students in U.S. history must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language.

D. Fields of Study

  1. The student will choose, in consultation with the advisor, three fields of study, one of which will be designated the dissertation field.
    1. The advisory committee will consult with the student and determine what and how many courses will be required in each field.
    2. In addition to the courses required in III.D.1., the student must take near the end of coursework 3 credit hours of “Reading for and Writing  Comprehensives” (HIST 8990) in each field, each of which is devoted to intensive individual study of the historiography of the field as a whole, compiling a bibliography of the important literature, gaining familiarity with the key debates, and writing the comprehensive examinations. The student may take up to 6 credits of HIST 8990 in the major field. No more than these 12 credits of "Reading for and Writing Comprehensives" may count toward the degree.
  2. Dissertation Fields
    1. United States before 1877
    2. United States after 1877
    3. Ancient World; normally a dissertation in Ancient History must be in the area of Egyptology.
    4. Modern Europe
    5. African American History
    6. Women and Gender History
    7. Global History
  3. Minor fields (in addition to the above)
    1. Medieval-Renaissance Europe
    2. Early Modern Europe
    3. Latin America
    4. Africa
    5. China and Japan
    6. Russia
    7. Near East
  4. The primary focus of at least one minor field must be on a geographical region different from that of the major field. With that restriction, a student may petition the Graduate Studies Committee for a field or fields not listed in the official list if the prospective field advisor agrees and the student’s advisory committee approves.
  5. Furthermore, the student’s major field may be subdivided into two separate fields if it embraces separate regions or is conventionally divided into separate fields (such as Ancient or Medieval-Renaissance).
  6. With the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee, one field may be taken in another department or may be interdisciplinary, including courses from at least two departments.
  7. Upon approval of a petition to the Graduate Studies Committee from both the student and a prospective dissertation director, a dissertation may be completed in a field that is not normally a dissertation field.

E. Concentration in Ancient Egyptian History (Note: “Concentration” refers to a specific program in this area. It does not imply that this is our only area of specialization.)

We expect students choosing this concentration to deepen their proficiency in Middle Egyptian and they must have a reading knowledge of French and German before they may take research seminars or write the dissertation. Admission into the graduate program in history does not automatically ensure admission into this concentration.  The approval of the department's Egyptologists is also necessary, so students should contact them directly.

F. Course Requirements

  1. A minimum of 60 semester hours of graduate course work beyond the bachelor’s degree plus 12 hours of HIST 9000 (Doctoral Dissertation), for a minimum total of 72 graduate credits. No more than 12 hours of dissertation credits will be counted toward the degree.
  2. The last 30 hours of course work (including 12 dissertation hours) must be from The University of Memphis.
  3. At least 6 credit hours of research seminars (HIST 7/8070) or their equivalent. A master’s thesis in history will count as one of these seminars and, by petition to the Graduate Studies Committee, an article in a peer-reviewed journal may count as one, but neither reduces the total number of credit hours required.
  4. Core requirements: One 7/8000-level course in the historiography of the major field and HIST 7/8011 (Philosophy and Theory of History). We recommend, but do not require, HIST 7/8100 (Global Historiography) and historiography courses in the minor fields; however, the advisory committee may require them. Whenever possible, students should take all the core courses in the first year.
  5. At most 6 credit hours of History 8012 (Directed Readings), with an additional 6 hours permitted in special circumstances by petition to the Graduate Coordinator.
  6. At most 6 credits of MA courses and 6 credits of PhD courses at the 6000-level. In special cases, the advisory committee may allow a total of 15 credits at the 6000-level.
  7. With the approval of the advisory committee, up to 33 hours of course work from the master’s degree, as well as any other graduate coursework completed before admission to the PhD program, may be counted toward the 60 credits.
  8. A student who makes a grade of B- or lower in 6 or more hours of course work will be dropped from the PhD program, except under exceptional circumstances. No grade of C+ or lower may count toward the required number of credits.
  9. The following courses do not count toward the degree: HIST 7/8021, 7/8990, and 7/8991 (except as described above in D.1.b).

G. Comprehensive Examination

    The Advisory Committee will review the progress of each full-time Ph.D. student at the end of both the first and second year, and will give their findings to each student in writing. Full-time PhD students with a history MA are expected to pass their Comprehensive Examination before the first semester of their fourth academic year, and in any case within six months of finishing the required coursework.

    Since the examination is designed to test knowledge of each field, it is not confined to material covered in classes and the books and articles read in them. We expect students to demonstrate an intellectual command of the subject matter, historiography, current scholarly controversies, bibliography, and whatever else is expected in each field. While reading lists for exams will vary in length and content, in most cases they will include at least 30–50 monographs in minor fields and 60–100 in the major field, or the equivalent in major articles.

    Preparation for the Comprehensive Examination should begin with the first PhD class, and, for MA students anticipating continuing in the PhD program, with the first graduate class. See the departmental Guide for Graduate Students for a complete description of the exam.

    Before scheduling the Reading for and Writing Comprehensives courses, the student must choose, in consultation with the advisory committee and with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee, a Comprehensive Committee composed of at least one faculty member from each minor field and two faculty members from the dissertation field. Usually, this is the same as the advisory committee.

    No sooner than the last semester of course work, in which the student will normally take only Reading for and Writing Comprehensives classes, and after satisfying the language requirement, if any, the Comprehensive Committee will administer a Comprehensive Examination over all fields. The committee, in consultation with the student, will decide whether the exam essays should be written simultaneously or not and may decide to spread them over not more than two semesters.

    The written portion of the exam consists of essays of about thirty pages length in each minor field and two such essays (or one longer one) in the major field. Students and field advisors will work out the format of these essays, based upon the nature of the field, the content of their coursework, and the reading lists and bibliographies developed for the Readings courses. The essays will be based on a series of broad questions and, in many fields, be historiographical in nature. They will draw from, but not be a mere compilation of, the written documents, described in the departmental Guide to be done in each previous course.

    After a student has completed all written parts of the Comprehensive Examination, the Comprehensive Committee will conduct an oral examination over all the fields, normally within two weeks, but if necessary the Comprehensive Committee may extend the time. After the oral exam, the committee will either pass the student or require the resubmitting of one or more written parts. After the student has resubmitted any required exams, the committee may choose to hold another oral examination, but it is not required to do so.

    The student may not resubmit any written examination, which will necessarily involve a major reconceptualization and revision of an essay, sooner than one full semester after the first attempt. After the student has retaken all required parts, including a second oral examination, if required, the Comprehensive Committee will decide whether, with the approval of at least three of the four members, the student should be promoted to late doctoral status or dropped from the program. Upon successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination, the coordinator of graduate studies will notify the Graduate School of the student’s late doctoral status. The student may enroll in dissertation hours only after passing the Comprehensive Examination.

H. Dissertation

To complete the requirements for the PhD in History, the student must prepare a dissertation based on a substantial amount of original research and submitted in the acceptable form.  The student determines the dissertation topic in consultation with a faculty member in the dissertation field who agrees to direct the research. NOTE: Students electing to write a dissertation should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.

Each PhD student must, within one semester after passing the Comprehensive Examination, present a prospectus of the proposed dissertation in a colloquy supervised by the Dissertation Committee. All history faculty and graduate students are invited to this colloquy, and all other interested persons are welcome. This is not intended as an examination, but rather as a forum in which the candidate can discuss ideas and receive suggestions and criticisms.

The Dissertation Committee consists of at least four graduate faculty, chaired by the director, who, with at least two other members, must have full graduate faculty status. It is recommended that one member be outside the discipline, department, or university. Prospective committee members not on the University of Memphis faculty must apply for Adjunct Graduate Faculty status. All graduate committees, including this one, should normally consist of tenured and tenure-track faculty. Other instructors at University of Memphis, untenured or non-tenure track instructors from other institutions, and unaffiliated scholars, with appropriate graduate faculty status may serve, but only with the approval of the committee chair and by a formal petition to the Graduate Studies Committee providing a full explanation of the reasons for the request. The Coordinator of Graduate Studies may waive the departmental requirement that three of the required four members hold Full Graduate Faculty membership when an Adjunct/Affiliate member's credentials warrant it. In these instances, only two of the departmental faculty members will be required to hold full Graduate Faculty membership. Only one adjunct or affiliate graduate faculty member may serve as a voting member; the director must hold full membership.

Formal approval of the final dissertation will be given by the Dissertation Committee and the Graduate Studies Committee.


HISTORY (HIST)

All 7000-8000 level courses whose names begin with "Studies" or "Thematic Studies" consist primarily of readings of important recent scholarly articles and monographs of a field or subfield and writings based upon these readings. They do not require the completion of major research papers, which are reserved for Research Seminars numbered 7/8070. Lengthy reading lists not relevant to the paper are not appropriate for Research Seminars. Both types of courses may be repeated when the content varies. 6000-level courses may not be repeated, nor taken if the student has already taken the 4000-level component or the equivalent at another school.

In addition to the courses below, the department may offer the following Special Topics courses:
HIST 6050-69. Special Topics in History. (1-3). Intensive study of selected topics in History. Topics are announced in online class listings.
HIST 7030-39–8030-39. Topics in History. (3). Topics within periods or problems that cross periods or subject areas. May be repeated when topic varies.


HIST 6020 - Internship In History (1-12)
Supervised internships working with various governmental agencies, private foundations, or businesses of interest to historians. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours credit, not more than 6 of which can be counted toward the satisfaction of degree requirements. PREREQUISITE: Permission of department.

HIST 6022 - Oral History (3)
Applied history covering oral history theory, research, and interviewing procedures.

HIST 6052 - Contemp History/Latin America (3)
History of Latin American from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present.

HIST 6053 - Violence in Early America (3)
Exploration of the relationship between violence, cooperation and accommodation within and between networks of people who inhabited North America.

HIST 6105 - War in the Ancient World (3)
Development of warfare from 2000 BCE to 1200 CE, from Bronze Age to Mongol conquests; emphasis on Greek and Roman warfare; tactics, methods, strategies; theories of war and their historical development; attention to relationships between cultures, technology, influence of culture on war and war on society.

HIST 6106 - War in the Modern World (3)
Development of warfare from 1400 to the present; tactics, methods, and strategies; theories of war and their historical development with particular attention to relationships between cultures, changing technology, and the manner in which war has been conducted; purposes for which wars are fought.

HIST 6126 - Victorian/Edwardian England (3)
Social, political, and cultural adjustments of England to the experience of industrialization in nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

HIST 6145 - History of Modern Germany (3)
Germany from the origins of the unification movement in the Napoleonic Era through the Second World War.

HIST 6151 - Habsburg Cent Europe 1740-1918 (3)
The Habsburg Monarchy brought relative stability to a region that has since experienced ethnic cleansing, mass murder, and dictatorship. Starts with the Habsburg dynasty's efforts to centralize its authority and ends with WWI, which led to the collapse of the Monarchy and redrawing the borders of east central Europe.

HIST 6160 - Russia to 1917 (3)
Russia from earliest times to 1917, with special emphasis on the rise of serfdom and autocracy and the evolution of the Revolutionary Movement.

HIST 6162 - Russia after 1917 (3)
Detailed study of 1917 Revolution and major developments in govenment, economy, cultural and social life, and international affairs that followed.

HIST 6213 - Women/Gender/Latin Amer (3)
Historical examination of the roles of women and gender in Latin America from colonial times to the beginning of the twentieth century.

HIST 6221 - 20th Century Latin Amr Rev (3)
Critical comparative examination of twentieth-century revolutionary movements in Latin America, focusing on Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, and Chile.

HIST 6222 - Race/Class Latin America (3)
Examination of race and class in Latin America from colonial times to the present, focusing on development of racial, ethnic, and class identities, and their roles in economic, social, political, and cultural life.

HIST 6260 - World Since 1945 (3)
Global, ideological, economic, and political developments since World War II; emphasis on rising affluence of industrial free market, movement of former colonies to independence, and growth in diversity among the Soviet bloc nations.

HIST 6272 - Modern Middle East (3)
Political, diplomatic, social, and religious developments in the Middle East from 1800 to present.

HIST 6276 - Palestine/Zion/Israel/Conflict (3)
Origins of the Israeli-Palestinian dispute from the late 18th century through the founding of the State of Israel and expulsion/flight of three quarters of a million Palestinians from the homes to the present day; major debates and controversies related to the dispute through primary and secondary sources.

HIST 6277 - Ottoman Empire (3)
Ottoman Empire people, geography, cultures, politics, administration, economy, and societies from its rise in the 13th century until its demise in 1922; major historiographical debates and literature related to the Ottoman Empire through primary and secondary sources, art, and literature.

HIST 6283 - History/South Africa (3)
South Africa from human origins to present, emphasizing 19th and 20th century economic and political history, examined within larger context of events throughout entire southern African region and globally; Apartheid system and liberation ideologies such as socialism, Pan-Africanism, and Black Consciousness explored through study of primary documents, film, and music.

HIST 6288 - West Africa/Diaspora (3)
History of West Africans from the 15th century to the present, focusing on trans-Atlantic slave trade and African diaspora in the Americas; particular emphasis on economic and social history through study of primary documents, film, and music.

HIST 6289 - African Women's History (3)
Experiences of women throughout entire history of African continent, from human origins to present; covers major epochs in African history, diversity of continent, and theoretical issues related to gender through study of primary documents, fiction, and film.

HIST 6292 - Modern China 1800-Present (3)


HIST 6294 - Modern Japan 1800-Present (3)


HIST 6297 - Ancient India (3)
History of India from earliest times to 1100; early period of Muslim rule; emphasis on cultural history, religious, legal, and other social institutions; Hinduism, Buddhism; "Aryan invasion" hypothesis; caste system; supposed "break" caused by Muslim invasions; British colonial representations of ancient India; relation between myth and history.

HIST 6320 - Ancient Near East (3)
From the beginnings of Mesopotamia down through the great empires of Assyria, Babylon, and Persia.

HIST 6321 - Greek Experience (3)
Politics, society, and culture in ancient Greece to Alexander the Great.

HIST 6322 - The Roman World (3)
Hellenistic kingdoms and the Roman Empire.

HIST 6323 - Egypt Of The Pharaohs (3)
A historical survey of ancient Egyptian civilization, covering major political and social developments and topics such as religion, writing, and literature, Egypt's relations with the rest of Africa, and sample problems that illustrate how Egyptologists approach the past.

HIST 6361 - Hist Byzantine Empire (3)
Byzantine or East Roman Empire from 330 to 1453 and its influence on the Slavic, Turkic, and Islamic peoples.

HIST 6372 - High Middle Ages (3)
Summary of the Early Middle Ages, economic, technological, cultural, intellectual, and religious expansion after 1000, courtly love, Romanesque and Gothic art, limited government, church and state conflicts, reason vs. revelation, universities, scholasticism, women, Judaism, science, Franciscans, Heretics, life of ordinary people, disasters of the fourteenth century, roots of the Renaissance.

HIST 6380 - Renaissance Europe (3)
Rise of humanism during fourteenth century disasters; intellectual, economic, social, cultural, religious, and artistic developments of fourteenth through sixteenth century, emphasizing Italy, especially Florence; women, life of ordinary people, guilds, republicanism and despotism, neoplatonism, Christian and civic humanism, Northern Renaissance. Is the Renaissance revolutionary or a development of medieval culture?

HIST 6390 - Europe-Age Reformation (3)
Characteristic political, social, economic, intellectual, and cultural developments and the religious conflicts of the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

HIST 6401 - Europe-Age Baroque (3)
Political crises, the development of monarchial absolutism, the rise of modern science, and cultural synthesis in the seventeenth century.

HIST 6440 - French Revolution (3)
Old Regime, origins and development of Enlightenment thought, and revolutionary and counter-revolutionary movements in 18th century Europe.

HIST 6453 - Europe 1815-1914 (3)


HIST 6461 - Europe 1914-1945 (3)


HIST 6620 - Colonial America to 1783 (3)
Political development and economic, social, and cultural institutions of English colonies in America, including origins and conduct of American Revolution.

HIST 6630 - New Nation/1783-1815 (3)


HIST 6640 - Jackson Amer 1815-1850 (3)


HIST 6680 - Emr Mod Am 1877-1914 (3)


HIST 6701 - U S 1914 To W War II (3)


HIST 6702 - U S Since W War II (3)


HIST 6823 - American Labor History (3)
Historical development of the labor movement in the United States; emphasis on social, economic, and political trends related to the labor movement.

HIST 6824 - Business History (3)
Historical development of business in the United States; attention to social, economic, and political trends related to American business communities.

HIST 6831 - History American Family (3)
Analysis of changes in family size and structure and relationships between family and society from colonial times to present.

HIST 6851 - Hist Women In America (3)
Economic, political, social, and intellectual history of women in the English American colonies and the United States.

HIST 6853 - African American Women (3)
The social, political, economic, and cultural history of African American women from the sixteenth century to the present.

HIST 6861 - Parks/People/Public Pol (3)
A comparative study of the history and administration of public land areas in the United States and of American conservation.

HIST 6863 - Hist Childhood/America (3)
Historical consideration of children and childhood in American society from early 17th century to present.

HIST 6871 - U S Urban History (3)
Development of American cities, including formation of local social, economic, and political institutions and impact of urbanization on US.

HIST 6879 - Africa To The Americas (3)
Surveys arrival of Africans in western hemisphere to expansion of antebellum slavery in the US Lower South by 1820; examines African diaspora, colonial slavery, impact of slavery upon formation of US, and development of African American culture; also explores relationships between enslaved and free Blacks, Europeans, and Native Americans.

HIST 6880 - Slavery/Freedom/Segretn (3)
Examines social, political, and economic developments; antebellum slavery and freedom impact on westward expansion; Civil War emancipation and post-war construction of black freedom; development and impact of legal and extra-legal segregation; black nationalism and pan-Africanism; and Progressivism through the beginnings of the Great Migration.

HIST 6882 - Civil Rights Movement (3)
Struggle for African American equality, with emphasis on key civil rights issues, events, leaders, and strategies.

HIST 6941 - Hist American Indian (3)
Role of the Indian in American history.

HIST 7011 - Phil & Theory of History (3)
Speculative philosophy of history and recent problems in analytical philosophy of history.

HIST 7012 - Directed Readings (1-3)
Arranged on an individual basis between a student and a particular instructor, whose permission is required. Master's students may take a maximum of 3 hours (6 by petition), PhD students a maximum of 6 hours (12 by petition). Grades of A-F, or I will be given.

HIST 7023 - Practicum in History (3)
Participation in a fieldwork project or other project supervised by an approval authority (University of Memphis faculty or directors from other institutions). Class is pass/fail and does not count toward the degree.

HIST 7024 - Fieldwork in History (3)
Preparation for, participation in, and writing about a fieldwork or other research project supervised by an approved authority (UM faculty or directors from other institutions). Project planning such as grant writing and budgeting, and other assignments related to the project?s goals are required.

HIST 7025 - Principles&Practices Hist Ed (3)
Explores the principles of history education, goals of student learning, and how to transform our classrooms into the kind active intellectual space that promotes those intellectual, analytical, and critical skills that will best prepare our students for life beyond the academy. Required for teaching assistants.

HIST 7060 - Women/Gender Historiography (3)
Theory and historiography of the field using major theoretical writings, from American and non-American perspectives, and from racially different viewpoints.

HIST 7061 - Studies Women/Gender Hist (3)
May be repeated when the content varies.

HIST 7070 - Research Seminar (1-3)
Emphasis on original research and writing in topics drawn from the fields generally covered by the Studies courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. PREREQUISITE: One 7000-level historiography course in any field.

HIST 7100 - Global Historiography (3)
Formation, development, and importance of global/ subglobal systems over time, societal interactions, and factors that favor or hinder the formation, development, and decline of various kinds of society; significance of biological, cultural, linguistic, intellectual, political, social, and economic elements for large-scale historical development.

HIST 7101 - Studies Global History (3)


HIST 7120 - Studies English History (3)


HIST 7160 - Studies Russian Hist (3)


HIST 7210 - Studies Latin Am Hist (3)


HIST 7270 - Studies Near East Hist (3)


HIST 7272 - Historiography Mod Middle East (3)
This seminar is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the most important ideas and debates in the field of modern Middle Eastern history (18th century to the present) and place those ideas and debates within the context of general historiographic trends.

HIST 7280 - Africa (3)


HIST 7290 - Studies Asian History (3)


HIST 7310 - Ancient Historiography (3)
Examines scholarship of ancient history and controversial problems in the field with a view to developing a more sound historical methodology for reconstructing ancient history; usually focuses on Egypt, but may address another area of ancient history. May be repeated when focus area changes.

HIST 7320 - Studies Ancient Hist (3)


HIST 7370 - Studies Medv/Renai Hist (3)


HIST 7400 - Studies Early Mod Hist (3)


HIST 7430 - European Historiography (3)
Introduction to major themes, methodologies, and scholarly debates in European history; explores historiographic flashpoints represented in major texts that constitute key points of reference for scholars; usually focuses on Modern Europe, but may address other periods of European history. May be repeated when focus area changes.

HIST 7440 - Modern Europe (3)


HIST 7601 - US Historiography to 1877 (3)
Reading seminar in early US history that explores historiographical debates and in-depth examinations of major themes and periods in American history to 1877.

HIST 7602 - US Historiography after 1877 (3)
Reading seminar in modern US history that explores historiographical debates and in-depth examinations of major themes and periods in American history from 1877 to the present.

HIST 7650 - Studies U S Hist To 1877 (3)


HIST 7680 - Studies U S After 1877 (3)


HIST 7880 - Af Amer Historiography to 1800 (3)
Introduces some of the most recent as well as standard scholarship on African American history before 1800; discussion of assigned core readings supported by written reports.

HIST 7881 - Af Amer Historiography: 19 ce (3)
Introduces some of the most recent as well as standard scholarship on 19th century African American history; discussion of assigned core readings supported by written reports.

HIST 7882 - Af Amer Historiography: 20ce (3)
Introduces some of the most recent as well as standard scholarship on African American history before 1800; discussion of assigned core readings supported by written reports.

HIST 7883 - Studies African Am Hist (3)


HIST 7884 - Af Amer History and Profession (3)
Introduction to basic philosophical problems of recreating and understanding the African American past, to history of historical writing by African Americans and other scholars, and to practical skills needed by professional historians in this field.

HIST 7980 - Thematic Studies Amer (3)


HIST 7991 - Independent Readings (1-12)
Arranged on an individual basis for history students only. May be repeated. NOTE: History majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements.

HIST 7996 - Thesis (1-6)
The student must write and defend satisfactorily a thesis on a subject approved by the major professor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

HIST 8011 - Phil & Theory of History (3)
Speculative philosophy of history and recent problems in analytical philosophy of history.

HIST 8012 - Directed Readings (1-3)
Arranged on an individual basis between a student and a particular instructor, whose permission is required. Master's students may take a maximum of 3 hours (6 by petition), PhD students a maximum of 6 hours (12 by petition). Grades of A-F, or I will be given.

HIST 8023 - Practicum in History (3)
Participation in a fieldwork project or other project supervised by an approval authority (University of Memphis faculty or directors from other institutions). Class is pass/fail and does not count toward the degree.

HIST 8024 - Fieldwork in History (3)
Preparation for, participation in, and writing about a fieldwork or other research project supervised by an approved authority (UM faculty or directors from other institutions). Project planning such as grant writing and budgeting, and other assignments related to the project?s goals are required.

HIST 8025 - Principles&Practices Hist Ed (3)
Explores the principles of history education, goals of student learning, and how to transform our classrooms into the kind active intellectual space that promotes those intellectual, analytical, and critical skills that will best prepare our students for life beyond the academy. Required for teaching assistants.

HIST 8060 - Women/Gender Historiography (3)
Theory and historiogrphy of the field using major theoretical writings, from American and non-American perspectives, and from racially different viewpoints.

HIST 8061 - Studies Women/Gender Hist (3)
May be repeated when the content varies.

HIST 8070 - Research Seminar (1-3)
Emphasis on original research and writing in topics drawn from the fields generally covered by the Studies courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. PREREQUISITE: One 7/8000-level historiography course in any field.

HIST 8100 - Global Historiography (3)
Formation, development, and importance of global/ subglobal systems over time, societal interactions, and factors that favor or hinder the formation, development, and decline of various kinds of society; significance of biological, cultural, linguistic, intellectual, political, social, and economic elements for large-scale historical development.

HIST 8101 - Studies Global History (3)


HIST 8120 - Studies English History (3)


HIST 8160 - Studies Russian Hist (3)


HIST 8210 - Studies Latin Am Hist (3)


HIST 8270 - Studies Near East Hist (3)


HIST 8272 - Historiography Mod Middle East (3)
This seminar is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the most important ideas and debates in the field of modern Middle Eastern history (18th century to the present) and place those ideas and debates within the context of general historiographic trends.

HIST 8280 - Africa (3)


HIST 8290 - Studies Asian History (3)


HIST 8310 - Ancient Historiography (3)
Examines scholarship of ancient history and controversial problems in the field with a view to developing a more sound historical methodology for reconstructing ancient history; usually focuses on Egypt, but may address another area of ancient history. May be repeated when focus area changes.

HIST 8320 - Studies Ancient Hist (3)


HIST 8370 - Studies Medv/Renai Hist (3)


HIST 8400 - Studies Early Mod Hist (3)


HIST 8430 - European Historiography (3)
Introduction to major themes, methodologies, and scholarly debates in European history; explores historiographic flashpoints represented in major texts that constitute key points of reference for scholars; usually focuses on Modern Europe, but may address other periods of European history. May be repeated when focus area changes.

HIST 8440 - Modern Europe (3)


HIST 8601 - US Historiography to 1877 (3)
Reading seminar in early US history that explores historiographical debates and in-depth examinations of major themes and periods in American history to 1877.

HIST 8602 - US Historiography after 1877 (3)
Reading seminar in modern US history that explores historiographical debates and in-depth examinations of major themes and periods in American history from 1877 to the present.

HIST 8650 - Studies U S Hist To 1877 (3)


HIST 8680 - Studies U S After 1877 (3)


HIST 8880 - Af Amer Historiography to 1800 (3)
Introduces some of the most recent as well as standard scholarship on African American history before 1800; discussion of assigned core readings supported by written reports.

HIST 8881 - Af Amer Historiography: 19 ce (3)
Introduces some of the most recent as well as standard scholarship on 19th century African American history; discussion of assigned core readings supported by written reports.

HIST 8882 - Af Amer Historiography: 20ce (3)
Introduces some of the most recent as well as standard scholarship on African American history before 1800; discussion of assigned core readings supported by written reports.

HIST 8883 - Studies African Am Hist (3)


HIST 8884 - Af Amer History and Profession (3)
Introduction to basic philosophical problems of recreating and understanding the African American past, to history of historical writing by African Americans and other scholars, and to practical skills needed by professional historians in this field.

HIST 8980 - Thematic Studies Amer (3)


HIST 8990 - Reading for/Writing Comps (1-12)
Arranged on an individual basis for history students only. May be taken only at the end of coursework to fulfill the requirements for the PhD. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

HIST 8991 - Independent Readings (1-12)
Arranged on an individual basis for history students only. May be repeated. NOTE: History majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements.

HIST 9000 - Doctorl Dissertation (1-12)
No more than 12 hours may count toward the degree. PREREQUISITE: Admission to candidacy.Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

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